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20121202
20121210
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 5:30pm PST
after the united nations' general assembly voted to recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state. the u.s. opposed that vote. on friday secretary of state hillary clinton criticized the israeli construction plan as well saying it will set back the cause of the negotiated peace. today state department spokesman mark toner echoed clinton's warning. >> we consider these kinds of actions, these kinds of unilateral decisions to be counterproductive and make it harder to resume direct negotiations. >> suarez: israeli settlers dismissed the outside criticism. instead they said there should be no stopping the construction for any reason. >> this announcement is actually called for. the big question is why do we need to do these things as a reaction to something? if we believe in our ability, in our need to build and expand the land of israel then that's what we should do regardless of what the other side is doing. >> suarez: an israeli government planning meeting on the new settlement is expected later this week. actual construction could still be months or even years away. for mor
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 3:00pm PST
united nation's climate change has been working towards one specific goal. that is cutting carbon emissions before the global average temperature increases by two degrees celsius or 3.6 degrees fahrenheit. that's the critical point we can't go past. it's a point of no return. what this study tells us is that the culmination of the carbon dioxide that's already in the atmosphere and the carbon dioxide that's projected to come into the atmosphere over the next few years with development from india and china is already so much that it is almost inevitable that we will go past that two-degree... that two-degree critical mark. we're pretty much on track at this point now to go past the point that we've all been trying to avoid. >> ifill: if we go past it, what happens? >> it's a big point. the two-degree mark is the point at which the polar ice sheets will melt leading to rapid sea-level rise. it's also a point at which many areas of the world will no longer be able to grow food. it's likely we could see price spikes, food shortages. these are the kinds of things that will set off a lo
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 5:30pm PST
to read too much into it. lakhdar brahimi, as you know, replaced kofi annan as the united nations and arab league special envoy last summer when mr. annan left. he is trying desperately to try to put together some kind of a diplomatic game plan to put an end to the civil war in syria and to inspire a complete political transition. so this was his initiative to try to bring these two senior officials together. >> pelley: if we're at a crucial moment here, how much has the u.s. actively engage with opposition groups in syria and should it they be more engaged? >> the u.s. is actively engaged with the syrian opposition both inside syria or at least with contacts with group inside syria and with the external pop sigs as well. the united states played an important role in encouraging the opposition to form a new national coalition which does appear indeed to be quite representative of the opposition. >> brown: how much are we able to control the flow of arms and supplies inside? are we able to pick the good guys and the bad guys? the potential winners and losers? how much do we play a role
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 3:00pm PST
center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus in the long run. >>
PBS
Dec 10, 2012 3:00pm PST
stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: michigan, home to the united auto workers and one of the most heavily unionized states in the country, is suddenly ground zero in the national debate over workers' rights, as the republican lawmakers who control the state's legislature prepare to cast a vote tomorrow that could permanently alter the political landscape. >> ifill: hundreds of people descended on the state capitol building in lansing last week to protest a move to make michigan a right-to-work state. republicans running the state house and senate have approved a pair of bills to allow workers to hold union jobs without joining the union. organized labor was furious. >> you will have people that will be working right ale long side of you that will not have to pay union dues but you pay union dues but will still be able to get all the benefits from being a union member. >> ifill: democrats in the legislature complained that republicans rammed through the bill with no hearings or public comments. >> this is a travesty. they're pushing this at the 11th hour because they know that the
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)